Presentations

For the most recent and confirmed upcoming events, see Forthcoming and Previous Presentations.

  1. Second European Molecular Biology Conference on Computer Analysis of Nucleotide Sequence Information, Schonau, West Germany, May, 1981. “The Delila System”.
  2. Maximum Entropy and Bayesian Methods in Applied Statistics, 6th Annual Workshop, Seattle, Washington, August 5-8, 1986. “Information Content of Binding Sites on Nucleotide Sequences”.
  3. Macromolecules, Genes, and Computers, Waterville Valley, N. H., August 12-17, 1986. “Directions for Genetic Sequence Data Bases”.
  4. December 1988, Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD. Host: David Draper.
  5. August 17, 1990 Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, MD.
  6. Supercomputing Research Center, Bowie, MD. May 24, 1991, “Theory of Molecular Machines”.
  7. Partnerships in Education Workshop, The Regional Education Service Agency of Appalachian Maryland, Hagerstown, MD. January 31, 1992. “NCI-FCRDC Student Intern Program: Planning for our Scientific Future.”
  8. CREST Statewide Conference on Science and Engineering Partnerships. University of Maryland, College Park. April 7, 1992. “National Cancer Institute Student Intern Program: Planning for our Scientific Future.”
  9. Physics of Computation Workshop, Dallas, Texas, October 2-4, 1992, “Use of Information Theory in Molecular Biology”.
  10. Neils Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark, April 20, 1993: “Information Theory of Molecular Binding Sites: Bits and Sequence Logos”
  11. Department of Physical Chemistry at the Technical University of Denmark, Lyngby, Denmark, April 22, 1993: “Theory of Molecular Machines: Gumballs and Hyperspace”. (5 hours of lectures, in combination with previous lecture.)
  12. Frederick Community College, May 10, 1993, “Use of Information Theory in Molecular Biology”.
  13. The Washington Evolutionary Systems Society (WESS) Washington, D.C., November 4, 1993, “Information Theory and Molecular Recognition”.
  14. Washington-Baltimore Section of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics (SIAM) in conjunction with the American Mathematical Society and the Mathematical Association of America, Washington, D.C., April 26, 1994, “New Approaches in Mathematical Biology: Information Theory and Molecular Machines”.
  15. Biomolecular Databases: Current Status, June 13-14, 1994, Biophysical Society, Bethesda, MD. “Philosophy and Definition for a Universal Genetic Sequence Database”.
  16. Third International E. coli Genome meeting, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, November 4-8, 1994, “New approaches in mathematical biology: information theory and molecular machines”.
  17. New England Biolabs, Beverly Mass. February 9, 1995 “New Approaches in Mathematical Biology: Information Theory and Molecular Machines”.
  18. Ptashne Laboratory, Harvard, Mass. February 10, 1995 “New Approaches in Mathematical Biology: Information Theory and Molecular Machines”.
  19. Keynote speaker for the Informatics session of the Trieste Conference on Chemical Evolution, IV: Physics of the Origin and Evolution of Life, Cyril Ponnamperuma Memorial. Trieste, Italy, September 4-8, 1995. [30] “New Approaches in Mathematical Biology: Information Theory and Molecular Machines”.
  20. Department of Genetics of the North Carolina State University. February 26, 1996 “New Approaches in Mathematical Biology: Information Theory and Molecular Machines”.
  21. Workshop on Gene Networks and Cellular Controls, Hotel duPont, Wilmington, Delaware 18-19 June 1996. Sponsored by the Office of Naval Reasearch. “Information capacity and molecular recognition in gene control”.
  22. Fourth Workshop on Physics and Computation: PhysComp96, Boston, Mass 22-24 November 1996, Boston University. “New approaches in mathematical biology: information theory and molecular machines”
  23. Second Gordon Research Conference on “Modern Developments in Thermodynamics” February 16-21, 1997, Holiday Inn, Ventura, California. “Information theory and molecular recognition”.
  24. National Library of Medicine, Bethesda, MD. Tue, Sep 30, 1997. “Logos and walkers: graphical analysis of splice junctions and other binding sites, with clinical application”
  25. Johns Hopkins Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. October 1, 1997. “Logos and walkers: graphical analysis of splice junctions and other binding sites, with clinical application”
  26. NIH Biotechnology Interest Group, 1997 October 14, “Logos and walkers: graphical analysis of splice junctions and other binding sites, with clinical application”
  27. Organizer and speaker at the session Thermodynamics and Information Theory in Biology, 1998 American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Annual Meeting and Science Innovation Exposition Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Monday, February 16, 1998, 3:00pm-6:00pm, Track: Emerging Science: Transforming the Next Generation Session number: 101.0. “Information Theory in Molecular Recognition: Efficiency of Molecular Machines”
  28. Speaker at the meeting “After the Genome: Envisioning Biology in the Year 2010” conference IV, Jackson Hole, Wyoming, October 10-14, 1998.
  29. Speaker in the Computational Sciences & Informatics Colloquium, George Mason University, “Molecular Information Theory: From Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency” Dec. 3 , 1998.
  30. Invited to give a Science Innovation Topical Lecture at the AAAS Annual Meeting and Science Innovation Exposition (1999 January 23, 1:30pm-2:15pm, Anaheim, CA). “Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency”.
  31. Molecular Information Theory, April 27, 1999 at the Transcription Factors Interest Group Conference, Holiday Inn Conference Center, Frederick, MD.
  32. 2000 Feb 7: “Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency” at the Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia MO.
  33. 2000 May 20: “Evolution of Biological Information” at the Washington Evolutionary Systems Society Annual Symposium on General Evolutionary Systems, Georgetown University, Georgetown, MD.
  34. “Molecular Information Theory” at the International Summer School on “DNA and Chromosomes: Physical and Biological Approaches” Institut d’Ètudes Scientifiques de Cargèse, Cargèse, Corsica, France, July 31-August 12, 2000.
  35. “Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency” in a symposium on “Macromolecular Machines” at the Burnham Institute, La Jolla, USA, April 5, 2001.
  36. “Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding”. George Mason University, School of Computational Sciences Bioinformatics Colloquium 2001 November 6. Host: Iosif Vaisman, http://binf.gmu.edu/vaisman/
  37. “Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding”. Frederick Faculty Seminar Series, December 12, 2001.
  38. “Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding”. 2002 January 17. Thursday, North Carolina State University in the Microbiology Department. 10:00-11:00 am, Stephens Room (Gardner 3533). Host: Eric Miller,
    http://www.microbiology.ncsu.edu/people/faculty/Miller.html
  39. “Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding”. 2002 February 7. Department of Mathematics. The Pennsylvania State University State College, Pennsylvania, Mathematics Colloquium. Host: Howard Weiss,
    http://www.math.psu.edu/oldColloquium/020207.html
  40. “Twenty Years of Delila and Molecular Information Theory”. Altenberg-Austin Workshop in Theoretical Biology in Altenberg (Vienna), Austria, July 11-14, 2002. The 8th workshop, on BIOLOGICAL INFORMATION BEYOND METAPHOR: Causality, Explanation, and Unification.
  41. Institute for Pure and Applied Mathematics (IPAM) Workshop I: Alternative Computing September 30 - October 3, 2002, UCLA Los Angeles CA. Molecular Information Theory: Molecular Efficiency and Flip-Flops. Wednesday October 2, 2002, 3:30 pm.
  42. The Center for Advanced Research in Biotechnology CARB (9600 Gudelsky Drive, Rockville, Maryland 20850, contact: Dr. Harold Smith ) by Tom Schneider. Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding. 2002 December 2 Monday, 11:00 am.
  43. The University of Richmond, Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency. 2003 January 27, Monday, 4:30 pm. Hosts: Karen Lewis and Peter Smallwood.
  44. The Virginia Commonwealth University by Tom Schneider. Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Binding Site Evolution. 2003 January 28, Tuesday, 1:00 pm. Host: Gail Christie
  45. CANCUN Mexico 2003 17 - 21 September, 25th ANNUAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE OF THE IEEE ENGINEERING IN MEDICINE AND BIOLOGY SOCIETY Special Session on Communication Theory, Coding Theory and Molecular Biology
  46. “Genomes 2004: International Conference on the Analysis of Microbial and Other Genomes” (http://www.tigr.org/conf/mg/) held from April 14-17, 2004, The Wellcome Trust Conference Centre Hinxton, Cambridge, United Kingdom (This conference was originally to be held at the Institut Pasteur, France, April 14 - 17th, 2004 www.pasteur.fr/gmp but it was cancelled. It was then located to the UK.)
  47. The Chemical Theatre of Biological Systems” 24th - 28th May, 2004 in Bozen, North Italy. Session: “Application of Information Theory to Chemical and Biological Systems” hosted by the Beilstein-Institut.
  48. Wesleyan Biology Department’s Seminar Series, Middletown, Connecticut, February 3, 2005. Molecular information theory: From clinical applications to molecular machine efficiency.
  49. FinBioNet 2005 Symposium, October 6-7, 2005. Ellivuori, Finland. Molecular information theory: From clinical applications to molecular machine efficiency.
  50. The University of Missouri - Kansas City Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering (CSEE) Seminar Series by Tom Schneider. Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Binding Site Evolution, 2005 November 11.
  51. Mathematical Biosciences Institute (MBI) at the Ohio State University, Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Binding Site Evolution, 2005 November 14-18. This is part of a workshop on Aspects of Self-Organization in Evolution organized by Chris Adami and Claus O. Wilke.
  52. Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency. Frederick Faculty Seminar Series, February 15, 2006.
  53. Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD. 2006 Feb 22 4:00 pm, Molecular Information Theory: Flippers, Flappers and Flip-Flops in DNA Binding,
  54. School of Electrical and Computer Engineering – Cornell University Ithaca, NY 14853-6701. 2006 March 28 Molecular Information Theory: from Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency, Host: Sergio Servetto of the Cornell Communication Networks Research Group.
  55. Graduate Group in Computational and Genomic Biology, University of California, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Berkeley, CA 94720, Sep 19, 2006. Molecular Information Theory: From Clinical Applications to Molecular Machine Efficiency,
  56. The Keck Graduate Institute, Claremont, CA, 91711, September 22, 2006. Molecular Information Theory: From Clinical Applications To Binding Site Evolution.
  57. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, April 2, 2008. Evolution in a Nutshell
  58. The Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, May 29, 2008. Molecular Information Theory: From Clinical Applications To Binding Site Evolution.
  59. NCI Frederick Faculty Seminar Series. More Molecular Information Theory. Jan 14, 2009.
  60. Plenary speaker at the Workshop on Biological and Bio-Inspired Information Theory held in conjunction with the 43rd Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems March 18-20, 2009 The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, USA
  61. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, March 31, 2009. Evolution in a Nutshell
  62. Jena, Germany June 16-21, 2009, the Jena Life Science Forum 2009: The Molecular Language of Life
  63. Information theory and molecular biology, September 24, 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Rockville, MD. Host: Bernard Brooks.

  64. Information theory and molecular biology, November 13, 2009, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), Bethesda, Maryland. Host: Mark Knepper,

  65. “Information theory and molecular biology”, December 10, 2009, National Library of Medicine, National Center for Biotechnology Information, Bethesda, Maryland. Host: Eugene Koonin.

  66. Systems Biology Colloquium, Humboldt-Universität and Charitee University Berlin, Germany. 2010 Feb 12. Information theory and molecular biology, Host: Dr. Hanspeter Herzel of the Institute for Theoretical Biology
  67. Plenary talk at the workshop Information Theory meets Biology, Feb 16 and 17 2010, Institute of Telecommunications and Applied Information Theory, Ulm University, Germany. Information theory and molecular biology, Information Theory meets Biology2010 (PDF). Host: Dr. Martin Bossert, Ulm University, Germany
  68. Information theory and molecular biology, at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County Biological Sciences. 2010 April 1. BS 004, 4:00 pm, Host: Ivan Erill.
  69. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, April 27, 2010. Evolution in a Nutshell
  70. SIAM Conference on the Life Sciences (LS10 July 12-15, 2010, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, The David L. Lawrence Convention Center, MS69, Minisymposium: Information Theory for Bioinformatics 4:00 PM - 6:00 PM on July 15th, 4 pm. Efficiency of Molecular Machines. Organizers: Sarosh N. Fatakia (NIDDK, NIH) and Carosh Chow (NIDDK, NIH).
  71. Perspectives in High Dimensions 2-6 August 2010 at Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland. 70% efficiency of bistate molecular machines explained by information theory, high dimensional geometry and evolutionary convergence, Host: Elizabeth Meckes. See:
    Embracing complexity: Theoretical math is the basis for facial recognition programs and modeling of intricate systems
  72. “70% efficiency of bistate molecular machines explained by ‘information theory, high dimensional geometry and evolutionary ‘convergence”, at the Rutgers Department of
    Electrical & Computer Engineering Colloquium Series February 23, 2011 Host: Dr. Athina Petropulu and Dr. Christopher Rose. Slides from the talk
  73. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, May 4, 2011. Evolution in a Nutshell
  74. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, April 24, 2012. Evolution in a Nutshell
  75. NCI Frederick Faculty Seminar Series.
    Why Do Restriction Enzymes Prefer 4 and 6 Base DNA Sequences? Jan 11, 2012.
  76. Mathematical and Statistical Models for Genetic Coding September 26th to 28th 2013, Mannheim, Germany. Why is the Genetic Code Degenerate?
    http://www.am.hs-mannheim.de/genetic_code_2013.php?id=1
  77. BitsBiology, The Center for Bits and Atoms, MIT, May 1, 2014. Molecular Information Theory: Why is the Genetic Code Degenerate?
    http://cba.mit.edu/events/14.05.BB/index.html
  78. Science Unrestricted (presentation for K-12 Students, Families and Teachers), Institute for Defense Analyses, Alexandria, VA, 22311-1882, May 9, 2014. Evolution in a Nutshell
  79. NCI Frederick Faculty Seminar Series. Three Universal Principles of Biological States, June 11, 2014.
  80. Biological and Bio-Inspired Information Theory (14w5170) Three Principles of Biological States: Ecology and Cancer. 2014 Oct 29 Wednesday 09:04-10:13 at the meeting Biological and Bio-Inspired Information Theory (14w5170) at the Banff International Research Station (BIRS), Banff, Canada.
    http://www.birs.ca/events/2014/5-day-workshops/14w5170/videos/watch/201410290904-Schneider.mp4
  81. Three Principles of Biological States: Ecology and Cancer. 2014 Nov 21 at the
    National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD.
  82. sDiv workshop, “sFIND” on “Functional Information: its potential for quantifying biodiversity and its relation to ecosystem functioning”, 2015 September 7th to 11th, Leipzig, Germany.
  83. Information Theory in Biology. Shannon Centenary http://home.iitk.ac.in/~adrish/Shannon/, Department of Electrical Engineering at the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India, Wednesday, October 19th, 2016 and the Department of Biological Sciences & Bioengineering http://www.iitk.ac.in/bsbe/ Thursday, October 20th, 2016.
  84. “Three Principles of Biological States: Ecology and Cancer” at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia MO Life Sciences Week, in the Monsanto Auditorium at Bond Life Sciences Center. 2017 April 11, 1:15 p.m. Article about the talk:
    National Cancer Institute researcher to speak at Life Sciences Week Apr 4, 2017 By Jinghong Chen, Bond Life Sciences Center.


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